Pretty Scary 2: Unmasking Toxic Chemicals in Kids’ Makeup and Face Paint, a new report released by the Breast Cancer Fund’s Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, uncovered the widespread presence of toxic chemicals in kids’ cosmetics and face paints.

October 13, 2016 0 Comments

Pretty Scary 2: Unmasking Toxic Chemicals in Kids’ Makeup and Face Paint, a new report released by the Breast Cancer Fund’s Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, uncovered the widespread presence of toxic chemicals in kids’ cosmetics and face paints.

Pretty Scary 2: Unmasking Toxic Chemicals in Kids’ Makeup and Face Paint, a new report released by the Breast Cancer Fund’s Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, uncovered the widespread presence of toxic chemicals in kids’ cosmetics and face paints.  

HALLOWEEN-2016-MAKEUP

Read the report

Through product label reading and laboratory testing, the report revealed:

  • Lead was present in nearly 20% and cadmium in 30% of the Halloween face paints tested. The strong association of lead with damage to the brain and nervous system and learning and behavior problems has led the CDC to declare there is no safe level of childhood exposure to lead. Cadmium is a hormone disruptor linked to breast cancer. 
  • Toluene, a hormonally active, developmental and reproductive toxicant, was found in nearly 11% of the products tested hiding under the word “fragrance.”
  • Formaldehyde-releasing preservatives were present in 3% of products; formaldehyde is a known human carcinogen.

Most people assume the FDA regulates cosmetics and personal care products in the same way it does food and drugs to ensure they're safe. But in reality, cosmetics are one of the least regulated consumer products on the market today. Younger and younger kids are using makeup and face paint, contributing to exposures linked to breast cancer and other later life diseases.

Click here to urge your U.S. Senators to support meaningful, health-protective federal cosmetic safety reform that protects children and other vulnerable populations.

Make your voice heard to prevent the next generation from needless exposure to harmful chemicals in the cosmetics and personal care products they use every day.

In good health,

Janet Nudelman, Breast Cancer Fund Director of Program and Policy, and everyone at the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics

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